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6 Things Cordcutters Don’t Miss About TV

4.18 million Canadians don’t have TV subscriptions with cable or satellite providers. There’s a lot to be said about the growth of streaming, and how it is causing us to question our patience for long standing frustrations with traditional TV.. Commercials, bills, bundling, having your show get pre-empted for a football game—cordcutters miss none of these things. 

Commercials 

Watch a half-hour TV show and you get twenty-two minutes of actual show. Watch an hour long episode and you get forty-four minutes. The rest of that time? Commercials. Stuff you don’t want. Stuff you don’t need. Stuff you want but can’t get because you’re watching an American channel. Commercials louder than the actual TV show you’re watching. And then there’s the special kind of misery that are toy commercials, cereal commercials, and fast food commercials—you know, all the stuff aimed at kids. 

Promotions Superimposed on Top of the Show You’re Watching

There’s nothing that ruins the mood of Law & Order more than when there’s a little pop-up promotion in the lower third of the screen for The Tonight Show With Jimmy Fallon

Why? Who invented these things? Does anyone really like them? Do they even work? Why can’t we just watch the show we’re watching? 

Bills

The average Canadian household is spending $65 a month on cable. That adds up quickly, especially considering that for every household with a $25 skinny basic package, there’s another dropping more than $100 per month. Oh yeah, and those added fees that seem to add up.

Show Getting Pre-Empted 

If you’ve ever been a fan of a TV show scheduled immediately after a sport, then you know a special kind of frustration. The game goes long, cuts into your show, and then your show starts halfway through and you have no idea what’s going on. 

Bundling Channels 

You only want to watch the hockey game and a few premium scripted dramas, but you’re paying for the gardening channel, the fishing channel, a bunch of channels in languages you don’t speak, the fishing channel . . . wait, how many fishing channels are there? 

Remembering the 6 Channels You Like (Out of the 900 You Don’t)

No kidding, we know about twelve different households who keep a little paper by their TV with their favourite channels listed, title and number. Why? Because when the channels start in the 200s and continue through the 900s, it’s a pain in the butt to remember what you actually like. 

The Bottom Line

As you’ve already gathered, there’s a better way. Cut the cord. Start streaming everything online. Here’s how